Reflections on the Dancing girl of Mohenjo-Daro

The Dancing Girl is a bronze figurine discovered in the ruins of the ancient Harappan city of Mohenjo-Daro by archaeologists in 1926. Dated c. 2300-1750 BCE, the Dancing Girl—who is pictured nude in a self-assured pose, her arms and bracelets encircled with metal bangles, her hair wrapped in a bun to the side of her well-shaped head—is presently housed in the National Museum in New Delhi, India. The statuette is cast using the lost-wax method, where the mold is first created with clay and wax before tin and copper (bronze is an alloy) are poured in. Smelting was discovered in … Continue reading Reflections on the Dancing girl of Mohenjo-Daro

Howard Thurman, “Knowledge . . . Shall Vanish Away”

There is a sense of wholeness at the core of manThat must abound in all he does;That marks with reverence his ev’ry step;That has its sway when all else fails;That wearies out all evil things;That warms the depth of frozen fearsMaking friend of foe,Making love of hate,And lasts beyond the living and the dead,Beyond the goals of peace, the ends of war!This man seeks through all his years:To be complete and of one piece, within, without. — “Knowledge . . . Shall Vanish Away,” in The Inward Journey Continue reading Howard Thurman, “Knowledge . . . Shall Vanish Away”

ഭൂമിദാനം / भूदान / Bhoomidan

Bhoomidanam (“land gift”) was a movement led by Acharya Vinoba Bhave, an Indian sage and Gandhian disciple who walked hundreds of miles through India for 13 years with the mission of convincing landlords to renounce some of their holdings, for the social uplift of the poor and downtrodden and in order to promote village self-sufficiency. Chief amongst his many accomplishments was the founding of the Brahma Vidya Mandir, an ashram where women practiced agriculture, prayer, and nonviolence in order to achieve self-sufficiency. Like Gandhiji, he sought peace, freedom, and self-determination for the Indian people from the tyranny of the British … Continue reading ഭൂമിദാനം / भूदान / Bhoomidan

Mahatma Gandhi in Sudan

“In 1935, Mahatma Gandhi stopped over in Port Sudan (on his way to England through sea) and was welcomed by the Indian community there. In 1938, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru stopped over in Port Sudan on his way to Britain and was hosted through a function at the home of Chhotalal Samji Virani. The Graduates General Congress of Sudan formed in 1938 drew heavily on the experience of the Indian National Congress.” “British Indian troops fought alongside Sudanese in Eritrea in 1941 winning the decisive battle of Keren (Bengal Sappers won a Victoria Cross for mine clearance in Metemma, now on … Continue reading Mahatma Gandhi in Sudan