Howard Thurman, “Knowledge . . . Shall Vanish Away”

There is a sense of wholeness at the core of manThat must abound in all he does;That marks with reverence his ev’ry step;That has its sway when all else fails;That wearies out all evil things;That warms the depth of frozen fearsMaking friend of foe,Making love of hate,And lasts beyond the living and the dead,Beyond the goals of peace, the ends of war!This man seeks through all his years:To be complete and of one piece, within, without. — “Knowledge . . . Shall Vanish Away,” in The Inward Journey Continue reading Howard Thurman, “Knowledge . . . Shall Vanish Away”

Mahatma Gandhi observing the leprosy bacteria, 1942, Sevagram Ashram

What is this? Where is weakness? Who is strong? What is great and what is small? What is high and what is low in this marvellous interdependence of existence where the smallest atom is necessary for the existence of the whole? Who is great and who is small? It is past finding out! And why? Because none is great and none is small. All things are interpenetrated by that infinite ocean; their reality is that infinite; and whatever there is on the surface is but that infinite. The tree is infinite; so is everything that you see or feel — … Continue reading Mahatma Gandhi observing the leprosy bacteria, 1942, Sevagram Ashram

Howard Thurman – A Meditation on Thanksgiving

For all these I make an act of Thanksgiving this day. I pass before me the mainsprings of my heritage: The fruits of the labors of countless generations who lived before me, without whom my own life would have no meaning; The seers who saw visions and dreamed dreams; The prophets who sensed a truth greater than the mind could grasp and whose words could only find fulfillment in the years which they would never see; The workers whose sweat has watered the trees, the leaves of which are for the healing of the nations; … The restlessness which bottoms … Continue reading Howard Thurman – A Meditation on Thanksgiving

Satyagraha: Gandhian Principles of Non-Violent Non-Cooperation By William Stuart Nelson

Reprinted from THE JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS THOUGHT Autumn-Winter Issue, 1957-1958 CHANGE in the social order today is proceeding often violently and is frequently being resisted just as violently. Our own country is caught in a strange conjunction of Christian and democratic principles, fanatical resistence even to the belated application of these principles, and grave uncertainty as to how best the victims, the victimizers, and the innocent can escape both moral embarrassment and physical pain. Somehow, happily, men appear less reluctant than formerly to hear testimony to faith in non-violence, a testimony borne so urgently in the past by Jesus of … Continue reading Satyagraha: Gandhian Principles of Non-Violent Non-Cooperation By William Stuart Nelson

Martin Luther King, Farewell Statement for All India Radio, March 9, 1959 (Audio)

Farewell Statement for All India Radio Listen to Audio here Leaders in and out of government, organizations—particularly the Gandhi Smarak Nidhi and the Quaker Centre—and many homes and families have done their utmost to make our short stay both pleasant … Continue reading Martin Luther King, Farewell Statement for All India Radio, March 9, 1959 (Audio)

The Moral Government of the World: On Faith, Reason, and Truth

I. THE SOUL-FORCE IN HISTORY In his spiritual message to the world, notable because it is one of the rare extant speeches Mohandas K. Gandhi gave in English, the satygrahi remarked that There is an indefinable mysterious power that pervades everything, I feel it though I do not see it. It is this unseen power which makes itself felt and yet defies all proof, because it is so unlike all that I perceive through my senses. It transcends the senses. God is indescribable and ominpresent for Gandhi, capable of being sensed without manifesting physically. Love is perhaps the most important … Continue reading The Moral Government of the World: On Faith, Reason, and Truth

Tagore on Scientific Inquiry and Self-Realization

Yet no one really believes that science is the one perfect mode of disseminating mistakes. The progressive ascertainment of Truth is the important thing to remember in the history of science, not its innumerable mistakes. Error, by its nature, cannot be stationary; it cannot remain with truth; like a tramp, it must quit its lodging as soon as it fails to pay its score to the full. –Rabindranath Tagore, Sadhana Continue reading Tagore on Scientific Inquiry and Self-Realization